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Matt Valler's picture

Which resurrection story?

As it's Easter Sunday I've been contemplating Mark ch16, the first gospel account of the resurrection. Most Bibles have a footnote saying that the most reliable versions of Mark stop at verse 8, and that verses 9-20 were added on later. Which is significant, because it means 'Mark' gives us two quite different stories.

The longer version is the standard resurrection story, roughly as we know it. Jesus appears to Mary Magdalene, to two friends on a journey, to the eleven disciples in a room, and then ends with a commission and Jesus' ascension. It's a short but exuberant account. Jesus tells his disciples they will be able to pick up snakes and drink deadly poison. More than that: they will have the power to forgive and condemn. This account carries with it the scent of victory.

The short version, by contrast, is an extremely curt and confused affair. Three women approach the tomb to find it empty, except for a man dressed in white who tells them that Jesus has risen and gone ahead to meet them in Galilee. The women flee and 'said nothing to anyone because they were afraid.'

It's easy to understand why someone felt Mark needed a better ending!


Monkey's picture

The MonkeyBar Challenge Week 19

Hi everyone,

Hope you're enjoying the reading - Judges is a good easy read! And John isn't exactly difficult either. If you have fallen behind a bit, why not just pick up with both these books?

7 May Jdgs 6:1 – 7:8a; Psalm 57:7 – 11; John 5:16 – 5:30
8 May Jdgs 7:8b – 8:35; Proverbs 11:19 – 28; John 5:31 – 5:47
9 May Jdgs 9:1 – 9:57; Psalm 58:1 – 11; John 6:1 – 6:24
10 May: Jdgs 10:1 – 11:40; Psalm 59:1 – 8; John 6:25 – 6:59
11 May: Jdgs 12:1 – 13:25; Psalm 59:9 – 17; John 6:60 – 7:13
12 May: Jdgs 14:1 – 15:20; Proverbs 11:29 – 12:7; John 7:14 – 7:44
13 May: Jdgs 16:1 – 17:13; Psalm 60:1 – 4; John 7:45 – 8:11

Happy reading!
Monkey


Community of Readers's picture

Episode #18: The Republic of Heaven

Judges is a small book that covers a big period of Israel's history. So why is this part of the storyline tucked out of sight? Was having a king the answer to Israel's woes? And ours? And how should we relate to the 'king'-dom of God?


Monkey's picture

The MonkeyBar Challenge Week 18

Hi everyone,

Hope you're enjoying your readings. Well done to those who caught up again! This week, we end Joshua, begin Judges and really get into John.

30 Apr: Josh 17:1 – 18:28; Proverbs 10:31 – 11:8; John 1:29 – 1:51
1 May: Josh 19:1 – 21:19; Psalm 54:1 – 7; John 2:1 – 2:25
2 May: Josh 21:20 – 22:34; Psalm 55:1 – 11; John 3:1 – 3:21
3 May: Josh 23:1 – 24:33; Psalm 55:12 – 23; John 3:22 – 3:36
4 May: Jdgs 1:1 – 2:5; Proverbs 11:9 – 8; John 4:1 – 4:26
5 May Jdgs 2:6 – 3:31; Psalm 56:1 – 13; John 4:27 – 4:42
6 May Jdgs 4:1 – 5:31; Psalm 57:1 – 6; John 4:43 – 5:15

Enjoy!
Monkey


Community of Readers's picture

Episode #17: Mission and massacre

The story of Joshua is an ethical rollercoaster. On the one hand we want to cheer with the success of the people of Israel. But on the other, we stand appalled at the ethnic violence they perpetrate. How do we make sense of this book, and how do we make sense of the God it narrates?


Monkey's picture

The MonkeyBar Challenge Week 17

Hi everyone!

Happy Easter!! As Luke comes to an end our New Testament readings will follow the Easter story, right on time. And Joshua's conquering armies keep us busy in the Old.

23 Apr: Josh 3:1 – 5:12; Psalm 50:1 – 15; Luke 22:1 – 22:38
24 Apr: Josh 5:13 – 7:26; Psalm 50:16 – 23; Luke 22:39 – 22:62
25 Apr: Josh 8:1 – 9:15; Psalm 51:1 – 9; Luke 22:63 – 23:25
26 Apr: Josh 9:16 – 10:43; Proverbs 10:21 – 30; Luke 23:26 – 23:56
27 Apr: Josh 11:1 – 12:24; Psalm 51:10 – 19; Luke 24:1 – 24:35
28 Apr: Josh 13:1 – 14:15; Psalm 52:1 – 9; Luke 24:36 – 24:53
29 Apr: Josh 15:1 – 16:10; Psalm 53:1 – 6; John 1:1 – 1:28

Happy reading!
Monkey


Community of Readers's picture

Episode #16: All or nothing

The covenant between Yahweh and Israel was total. But it was also a massive gamble. Are we willing to gamble on a God who promises life through the doors of death? And how is Jesus' New Covenant better than the Old?


Monkey's picture

The MonkeyBar Challenge Week 16

Hi everyone,

Deuteronomy comes into land this week while Luke drives on towards the pinnacle of his gospel.

16 Apr: Deut 26:1 – 28:14; Psalm 46:1 – 11; Luke 17:11 – 17:37
17 Apr: Deut 28:15 – 28:68; Psalm 47:1 – 9; Luke 18:1 – 18:30
18 Apr: Deut 29:1 – 30:10; Proverbs 10:1 – 10; Luke 18:31 – 19:10
19 Apr: Deut 30:11 – 31:29; Psalm 48:1 – 8; Luke 19:11 – 19:44
20 Apr: Deut 31:30 – 32:52; Psalm 48:9 – 14; Luke 19:45 – 20:26
21 Apr: Deut 33:1 – 34:12; Psalm 49:1 – 20; Luke 20:27 – 21:4
22 Apr: Josh 1:1 – 2:24; Proverbs 10:11 – 20; Luke 21:5 – 21:38

Enjoy your reading!
Monkey


Community of Readers's picture

Episode #15: Work, rest and play

The Law of Deuteronomy is a masterpiece. Not only did it make creative ideas part of Israel's life, it challenges our society today. Our Western world is divided into sacred and secular; we must put back together what should never have been broken. But how do we do this in a democratic society that rejected theocracy for a reason?


The Dark Side's picture

The Dark Side (part VIII): What is the Bible for?

If you've been following this series from January you'd be forgiven for asking the question: when are we actually going to talk about how we read those difficult parts of the Bible where God is really violent?

It's a fair question.

We've talked around a load of related issues. But we've not yet tackled the question head on. So far this blog has been about clearing the debris; making some theological space so that we can have the best possible conversation.

Brian McLaren uses an analogy involving a car journey from New York to Los Angeles, East Coast to West. Somewhere in the south of Florida you hit traffic lights. To the left is one standard theological option; to the right is another. Which way should you go?

But the real question is: what are you doing in the south of Florida??

So often the questions we ask reveal just how lost we really are.